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OLD REBELLION
WAR RELICS



Remembering

Remembering The past, by living the future!




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UPDATED 10/25/2015

MANY MORE BUTTONS TO ADD

All excavated buttons are excavated from private property with owners permission



Now Showcasing

A collection of Revolutionary War Era Buttons

Here you will find a variety of early Revolutionary war buttons.

As a button collector, i have focused most of my collecting efferts on confederate buttons. Mainly confederate locals. I have only recently expanded my interests to include these beautifull buttons.

These buttons are some of the earliest ones that were made in the creation of our new nation. While very crude, very early ones just scream american pride in a new nation being formed out of war. French and British buttons while of better quality are also highlighted here. Dug examples are a little more plentiful, but non dug ones are rarely offered on the market and have premium prices

I would like to take time to thank Mr Robert Silverstein for his time in educating me on buttons and history of this time period. And to also say thanks for his willingness to part with some of the buttons from his very own collection. I am very gratefull am now the proud caretaker of some very early and rare buttons of the time period.

There are not many dealers out there dealing with this early period. Many buttons stay in collections for decades and only pass hands after a collector has passed on



We am pleased to now have a few of these in our collection

All items on this page are for historical reference and education

To further promote the hobby of military button collecting, history and preservation of our nations past.

***BUTTONS ARE CURRENTLY NOT FOR SALE, BUT I WILL CONSIDER SERIOUS OFFERS***


PLEASE ENJOY THIS VIRTUAL MUSEUM OF

*REV WAR BUTTONS*



CONTINENTAL(AMERICAN) BUTTONS



Continental army, and state buttons are extremely crude in comparison to the French and British of the time. Most were made from small molds in camp or in small shops as we had no factories as of yet to mass produce them. Made of a pewter type material, they were easy to make, but not very sharp detail was achieved,and shanks broke off easiely. All excavated buttons of this time are in poor condition, compared to other buttons later. The pewter just does not hold up after decades in the ground. But on the other hand All are rare and highly collectable, most if not all are from the North American area, and have premium prices to them, even in the condition they are in.


The "USA" Button
usafront.jpg (34180 bytes)
usaback.jpg (27613 bytes)
Backmark: "Blank (19mm)"
Continental army button, General service, enlisted man button.1 piece and made of pewter. Has the monogram of the initials USA, intertwined in high relief. This is the most common pattern of the time. There is considerable edge loss to this one, and once in the ground for decades they just start to disintegrate. The back still has the shank which is solid. These are still rare and highly collectable

This one was excavated decades ago from the Yorktown Va. battle area
Ref: Albert GI2, -



2nd Connecticut Regiment
2connreg2front.JPG (34180 bytes)
2connregback.JPG (27613 bytes)
Backmark: "Blank (22 mm)"
Extremely rare, 2nd Connecticut Regiment pewter Enlisted mans coat button. Great form and face, no erosion to edges. Bold 2. over C.R. in high relief. Back has trace of the shank. Excavated Ct Village, Cold Springs, NY. This button was made in a single button mold while the troops were garrisoned there around 1781.

Rarely offered and came from an old New England Collection
Ref: Troiani- A2CR.e, -



The "9th" Reg. Massachusetts Ordnance Button
9thregmassfront.jpg(34180 bytes)
9thregmassback.jpg (27613 bytes)
Backmark: "Blank (17mm)"
The state of Massachusetts procured thousands of these buttons from the French, by the order of 1778 and were termed "Ordnance Buttons". Its use was widespread all along the the New england Lines. Very common to campsites occupied between 1779-1783. Given out loose, you got what you got. They came in the large 24mm size and the small 17mm size. This button is the small 17mm size and was excavated in the Hudson Highlands. The face is somewhat deteriorated with some edge loss, but a good over all example. The 9 lies within a solid outer circle and inner broken circle with serifs seperated by a dot. The back still has the full turret shank. This button was previously in the collection of Mr. Robert Therbert Sr. before coming my way
Ref: Troiani- AMO9-H



The "6th Massachusetts

Regiment of 1781
6thmassregfront.jpg(34180 bytes)
6thmassregback.jpg (27613 bytes)
Backmark: "Blank (17mm)"
One piece cast pewter flat button. This style was part of the Continental Army's Reorganization of 1871. This is the enlisted man's 2nd pattern style, that has the raised arch letters "MASS" over the Roman numeral "VI" with crossed sword's underneath. This is the smaller 17mm version. The back has the loop shank which is original, straight, and intact. Being made of pewter it does have a fair amount of decay and edge loss, but over all a really good condition button for the period.

Service of enlisted men using this style button was primarily garrison duty in the Hudson Valley and around West Point

This button was excavated in the Hudson Valley, New York area.
Ref: Troiani- AM6.f



BRITISH BUTTONS



The British, The British. British made buttons of the time period are in contrast a thing of beauty. They exeude quality and workmanship. Companies like Firmin were already in business for years. they had by this time perfected the problem of button shanks falling off. This would plaque American makers until at least 1810. They also had very good quality die makers, such as jewelers, engraving dies for buttons. along with the process of plating and rolling stock thin enough for a button.

Buttons of this period are still rare and ones found in the North America area, are all highly collectable and pricey. Counterparts found in Europe are less desirable and a fraction of the cost dug or non dug. As with other buttons of the time period, they rarely change hands and not many are offered in the market place.




British Marine Button
britishmarinefront.jpg (34180 bytes)
britishmarineback.jpg (27613 bytes)
Backmark: ""Bone Back"(24mm)"
Here is a button you do not see much, and in this great of condition. An excavated British Marine enlisted mans coat button. The Front is somewhat wavy but shows excellant details, is of repousse brass, with the pie-crust border, featuring the incised fouled anchor. Has the larger loop on top and shows a more detailed anchor than normal. The back is of bone and is complete, but minus the shank. Also shows very crude crimping along the edge. Very scarce being excavated and still having the bone back.

This was dug in Eastern Florida years ago and was formally in the collection of noted collector/dealer Mr. Robert Oswald.
Ref: Troiani-BM.e. similar not pewter -



The King's Dragoon Guard

1768 to 1790
kingsdragoonguardmottofront.jpg (34180 bytes)
kingsdragoonguardmottoback.jpg (27613 bytes)
Backmark: ""Blank"(26mm)"
This large excavated 26mm coat button, once adorned the coat of an officer from the King's Dragoon Guards, serving in North America. This specific pattern is dated @ 1768-1790, and is an elaborate design for the late 18th century. Originally gilded in brass, most of which has now worn away. The pattern features a stamped crown adorning the top, the crown sits atop a seven pointed inset lined star. In the center is the "KDG" which is in high relief, with bold capital roman letters in a lined field. Encircling around is a band with the motto "Honi Soit Qui Maly Pense", which means "Evil Be To Him Who Evil Thinks" (Very Cool). This is an exceptional example, showing a crystal clear design. The back is smooth with the original stand up shank intact. No backmark visible.

This unit did not serve in America. however many officers from the KDG, including Tarlton, volunteered to serve in command of other units. This was a very commom practice of the period for British Officers to retain there Provenance rank's from England over here as a status symbol of who they are in the King's grace. This was excavated in North America, and lost by an officer serving in that capacity. Superb example and very rare
Ref: -



The King's Dragoon Guard

1785 to 1790
kingsdragoonguardfront.jpg (34180 bytes)
kingsdragoonguardback.jpg (27613 bytes)
Backmark: ""S.FIRMIN"(26mm)"
Here is another King's Dragoon Guard, large excavated 26mm coat button. This one was made a little later than the one above as it bears the backmark of "S. FIRMIN". It also once adorned the coat of an officer from the King's Dragoon Guards, serving in North America. This specific pattern issue is @ 1785-1790, and is an elaborate design for the late 18th century. Originally gilded in brass, most of which has now worn away. The pattern features a stamped crown adorning the top, the crown sits atop a seven pointed inset lined star. In the center is the "KDG" which is in high relief, with bold capital roman letters in a lined field. This one also would of had, Encircling around a band with the motto "Honi Soit Qui Maly Pense", which means "Evil Be To Him Who Evil Thinks" (Very Cool)As you can see the motto's lettering has been worn off. This is an very nice example. The back is a little more worn than the one above, but does have the original stand up shank intact. This one has the depressed backmark of S. Firmin. This is one of there earlier backmarks.

This unit did not serve in America. however many officers from the KDG, including Tarlton, volunteered to serve in command of other units. This was a very commom practice of the period for British Officers to retain there Provenance rank's from England over here as a status symbol of who they are in the King's grace. This button was excavated in the upstate New York area. Also lost by an officer serving in that capacity. A very good example and very rare
Ref: -



FRENCH BUTTONS



The French, our allies during the revolution. France had one of the largest armies at the start of the American Revolution. Buttons of the French Army and navy are also very well made. They have what is called a "turret shank", 4 hole pattern shank, which holds up well. The appearance of most buttons is simple and gracious. Having the regimental number within a circle which has a scroll opening at the top with a small dot. Many, many american troops wore French buttons on there uniforms.


French 41st Regiment Button
french41strgfront.jpg (34180 bytes)
french41stregback.jpg (27613 bytes)
Backmark: "Blank (24mm)"
Excavated large coat size, French 41st Regiment button. They were called the "Soissonnais Regiment", and became the 41st regiment in may of 1776. Sent to the United States in May of 1780. Were at the raid on Lloyd's Neck, NY and at the seige of Yorktown, VA Sept-Oct. 1781. This button was excavated near Yorktown, VA area. The button is in very good condition with a clear front showing the regimental # 41 within a circle which has a scroll opening at the top, with a small dot. No edge loss and has a clean and crisp apperance to it. The back is also in very good condition, with the complete turret shank. This unit is one of the more scarcer ones.
Ref: Troiani F41.c.-



French 47 Regiment Button

Early Artillery Button
french47thartilleryfront.jpg (34180 bytes)
french47thartilleryback.jpg (27613 bytes)
Backmark: "Blank (23.4mm)"
Here is a very early French 47th Artillery button, that you do not see that often. This is the earliest pattern @ 1767-1775, used by the Metropolitan Royal-Artillerie Artillery. This was a distinct corps from the Infantry and was consided as the finest and most technologically advanced artillery unit existing. In 1776 the 47 was replaced with 64. When units went to America the 64 was used through the end of the Revolution. So finds such as the 47th indicate some of the early buttons were still being used. This one was found in the South Carolina area.

The button is made of brass and is the large coat size. The front shows very clear, and there are no real pits or damage to the face. The 47 lies in the center and is surrounded by a cicle broken at the top with floral, dot above. Outside edge border. The back is somewhat dirty but has no damage or such. Has the full bird cage like shank.
Ref: Troiani FA47.c-



FRENCH BUTTONS